ontario-logo.png
slider-overlay.png
Trip Ideas » Escape to Halton Region's Hilton Falls

Escape to Halton Region's Hilton Falls

Take a scenic tour along Halton Region’s rural roads to discover exceptional beauty that can only exist in a place where incredible nature meets small-town charm and heritage. Visit hamlets, farms, shops and cafes, and make memories that will last a lifetime with this two-day touring itinerary.

When exploring our region’s trails, waterfalls and conservation areas, please follow posted safety rules, stay on marked trails and do not climb or bypass fencing. Stay at least a body length away from escarpment and gorge edges and always be alert for potential hazards such as falling rocks and slippery rock surfaces.

DAY ONE: HILTON FALLS CONSERVATION AREA
Hilton Falls features:

  • A captivating 10-metre waterfall
  • Access to the Niagara Escarpment, a UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve
  • Access to the Bruce Trail, Canada’s oldest and longest footpath
  • Stone ruins of a 19th century saw mill
  • 33.5 km of trails for hiking, biking and cross-country skiing
  • 18 km of tough terrain for mountain biking
  • A vast network of wetlands and forest that provide excellent opportunities for birding and wildlife viewing 
450 million years in the making, years of erosion from melting glaciers, ancient rivers and lakes led to the formation of Hilton Falls and surrounding area, creating craggy cliffs, rugged slopes and a UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve that is now home to a myriad of native plants and wildlife.
 
Today Hilton Falls welcomes explorers of all ages throughout all seasons to come and discover the geological phenomenon using the park’s 33.5 km trail system. Six distinctive trails wind their way through lush forests and wetlands, allowing visitors to explore the area by foot, bike or cross-country skis. Three trails are designated for hiking and cross-country skiing, and three are for mountain biking only.
 
The 4-km Hilton Falls Trail takes about 1.25 hours to hike and follows old logging roads and earthen paths through wondrous, widespread forests. It is the only trail in the park that leads to the stunning 10-metre waterfall and mysterious 19th century mill ruins.
 
The falls area has resting benches and interpretive signs highlighting the historical, natural and cultural side of the falls. Picnic tables are set up nearby and guests are encouraged to enjoy their lunch in the serenity of the park.
 
Explore More at Hilton Falls
The 3-km Red Oak Trail takes 45 minutes to hike and ascents the escarpment landscape on old logging roads that surround the Hilton Falls Reservoir. For an extended hike, head out on the 9.5-km Beaver Dam Trail. This 2-hour hike takes you along an extensive loop through wetlands and beaver meadows in the northern section of the park, crossing several headwater areas of the Sixteen Mile Creek.
 
The Bruce Trail, Canada’s oldest and longest footpath, meanders through the park, finding its way to the tip of the Hilton Falls Trail, leading hikers to the Hilton Falls Reservoir. Two tributaries of the Sixteen Mile Creek wind their way through the wooded, rocky landscape, flowing into the reservoir and feeding a series of beaver ponds. Anglers love the bounty of large-mouth bass found here.

Mountain bikers can find hours of adrenalin pumping fun on the Bent Rim (5 km), Single Track (7 km) and Wandering Lynx Backcountry (6.5 km) trails. Consisting of mostly rock and dirt surfaces, as well as bridges and loops, it is recommended bikers come prepared with extra tire tubes and tools when venturing out on this tough terrain.
 
After Hilton Falls
Once you’ve experienced Hilton Falls, head north on Guelph Line to Halton County Radial Railway, Ontario’s first and largest electric railway museum.
Known to many as the Streetcar Museum, this full-size operating electric railway and museum is home to equipment that dates back to 1901. Visitors are encouraged to ride the rails of the historic electric railcars that operate on two kilometres of scenic track. Plan to spend 1-1.5 hours at this historic site meandering from train car to train car. A stop-in at the lovely gift shop of inspired gifts and tasty treats, including an ice cream is a must during your visit.                                   

Those visiting from June-September are rewarded by the sweet scents of lavender at Terre Bleu Lavender Farm, the largest of its kind in Ontario. Here you’ll see incredible views of hues of lavender, and have the opportunity to learn about the cultivation of lavender, bees, the production of essential oils, honey and more. Guests can also choose to participate in lifestyle classes and activities, like yoga, arts and crafts, equestrian demos and musical performances. Be sure to stop in at the gift shop for locally made artisan gifts and sweet treats, like lavender ice cream. Shutterbugs will love capturing magnificent shots of this incredible sight.
 
Head back to Guelph Line and travel south to the Mohawk Chop House for a gastronomical delight. Committed to top-notch service and providing only the highest quality of food, locally sourced farm-fresh ingredients, heavily aged steaks and made-from-scratch recipes fill the plates of this rustic and charming, yet casual dining establishment.
 
Attached to the Mohawk Chop House is the Mohawk Inn and Conference Centre. Plan to stay here for the night. When the inn first opened in 1967, it was billed as the “first electric motel” in Ontario – an establishment with an early-Canadian colonial style and the comfort and convenience of all electric heating and cooling. Today the inn boasts more than the comforts of heating and cooling. Guests can enjoy modern amenities, an inimitable atmosphere and top-notch customer service.
Take advantage of great overnight packages like their Nature Package or Shop and Stay. Check online for current offers when booking your stay.

As an alternative for lodging, the KOA Toronto West Campground is adjacent to the inn and offers year-round camping and glamping.

DAY TWO: DISCOVER SMALL-TOWN CHARM

Begin your day exploring the world’s largest antique-leaded stained glass store and museum, The Stonehouse of Campbellville. The shop boasts a display of almost 2,500 antique stained glass windows, a gallery and a store where visitors can purchase these treasures. If you’re visiting during the holiday season, don’t miss the Christmas Festival of Lights. Every year the Stonehouse puts on a huge display with lights, music, animated boxes and more.                            
 
Stop in at the Flying Monkey Bike Shop and Coffee Bar in Campbellville for refreshments. Enjoy the atmosphere and chat with locals as you sip on a delicious latte or espresso.
 
The Village of Campbellville is a charming destination for heritage seekers with its ‘old world’ atmosphere and the preservation of heritage buildings – one of which was intended as an opera house.  For antique hounds, it is widely known for its several and unusual antique shops.                     
 
Just south on Guelph Line, approximately 4 km, take a scenic ride to Stonehaven Farms. Nestled in a picturesque pocket of the Niagara Escarpment, it is one of the region’s home grown farms boasting delicious selections of seasonal fruits and vegetables. The on-site bakery will tempt you with a host of baked goods and gourmet foods. Seasonal strawberry and pumpkin picking is offered as a “pick-your-own” option for those seeking a real farm experience.                                       
 
Next, take Guelph Line South to Derry Road (Halton Regional Road #7). Turn left on Derry Road, travelling eastbound, and feel surrounded by the beauty of the landscape, as the view of the escarpment is remarkable.
 
One of the most iconic views in the region can be found at Rattlesnake Point Conservation Area, Halton’s hidden gem. With its 12 km of trails and spectacular lookouts dotting the edge of towering cliffs, the park offers some of the best hiking and scenic viewing available on the Niagara Escarpment.  Adventurers can take to the cliffs for an amazing rock climb with experienced outfitters. 
  
As you pass Bell School Line, travelling a few kilometres east, notice on the right hand side a large white circular structure. It’s the velodrome that held cycling competitions during the 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games. Known as the Mattamy National Cycling Centre, this landmark venue is the cornerstone of cycling in Canada. Inside features a 250-metre Category 1 Homologated (certified) Cycling Track.
 
Take a quick tour along Termaine, travelling northwest. Make a right onto Main Street and follow the street until you’re in historic downtown Milton.
 
Park your car anywhere along Mill Street, James Street, or Main Street South. Drop by the Milton Historical Society Waldie Blacksmith Shop for a chance to step back in time. They are open mid-March through to December, every Wednesday and Saturday 10 am- noon. This is a fascinating museum of local preservation and artifacts.
 
The Town of Milton offers many historical tidbits for you to explore. Try a fascinating self-guided walking tour, or stroll through old Milton and its historic designated buildings and homes. Stop by the Town Hall for a sneak peek at the enchanting gardens on the grounds, just off Mary Street.   
 
Dine in historic Downtown Milton at one of the delicious eateries that are situated in heritage buildings along Main Street East and spend some time exploring the unique boutiques and shops.
 
For the last stop of the trip, head north to Halton Hills for a visit to Scotch Block Winery and Andrew’s Scenic Acres. Relax and unwind while sampling award-winning wines at the Mennonite-constructed barn house, and be sure to stock up on fresh fruits and vegetables at the on-site farmers’ market—the perfect way to end your stay in Halton Region.